• When photo journalist Tom Stoddart mentioned he would be going to meet Don McCullin to look over his new book, we thought it would be a great opportunity for him to road test the Q, Leica’s new system camera. HOTSHOE talked to Tom about his experience. HOTSHOE: How did you and Don McCullin first become acquainted? Tom Stoddart: I suppose that its been about 20 years. When I worked at The Sunday Times I would see him in the office, but I was a junior and he was a big star, so it wasn’t my place to talk to him. But I remember in 1982 I was working in Beirut, and he was there. Beirut was being bombed by Israeli forces, and it was around the time that Don shot [...]

  • After a timely review of his security arrangements, the minister was assigned a new bodyguard and driver. Both were relatively young, recently promoted to the service.“The ministry is an arm of the state,” their boss told them. “And you will be the arms of the minister.”It would have been more accurate to call them the butt-cheeks of the minister, given how long they spent on their asses, waiting for him to emerge from buildings. Friday afternoons meant waiting outside the Hotel Bristol. VIPs and foreign citizens only, no riff-raff allowed.They passed the time by arguing over which of them was the minister’s right hand, and which his left. Who would the minister choose if, for budgetary constraints or reasons of protocol, he could only take one of them?“I [...]

  • Made some 40 years ago, few had seen Karen Knorr’s Belgravia – a series of black & white portraits of residents of the eponymous, exclusive, residential London enclave – until their resurrection in 2014 for a year-long show at Tate Modern, and now presented in an elegant monograph book (Belgravia, Stanley/Barker 2015).Of German and Puerto Rican heritage, by way of American and French liberal arts formation, Knorr arrived in London in the sweltering summer of 1976, for a brief stay with her parents who had taken up residence in Lowndes Square, Belgravia. Knorr describes her passion for the medium of photography as tantamount to a vocational calling, and the critical discourse of the period, in particular around the politics of representation, the lighter fuel that ignited her practice, giving [...]

  • Canon’s PIXMA Pro range of desktop sheet-fed photo printers, the PRO-10S, PRO-100S and flagship PRO-1 make it easy for serious photographers to choose from by sharing a number of common features for superior colour and mono prints. Each model adopts Canon’s proprietary FINE print head technology and advanced imaging processing and the same colour conversion engine, delivering stunning quality prints ranging in size from 10x15cm (6x4-inches) to A3+, and offer support for heavyweight media up to 14-inches wide using the manual feeder with exceptional productivity. Canon’s Optimum Image Generating (OIG) system analyses the photo colour and precisely calculates the optimum ink combination and volume of ink droplets, which are then accurately placed on the paper by Canon’s FINE print head with 12,288 nozzles.The top-of the-range PRO-1, for example, can deliver a [...]
  • As Derek Ridgers new book The Others published by Idea, begins to be slotted neatly into book shelves across the world, we caught up with the British photographer to find out more. Gregory Barker: How did you first become interested in photography. Derek Ridgers: I think I’ve always been interested in photography but I wasn’t at all interested in taking photographs myself when I was young.  I went to art school when I was 16 and there was a photography department and photography lessons but I didn’t listen and didn’t care.  I wanted to be a painter and was focused entirely on that.  But I used tear out photos of things that interested me and keep them, right from my early teens.  Like most heterosexual young men, there were lots of photographs of [...]
  • Nearly half a century after the Factory closed, with the sheen of its silver doors still gleaming in our collective consciousness, Gregory Barker spoke to Billy Name of Factory fame about why it still captivates us. Gregory Barker: How was it that you first got mixed up with Andy Warhol? Billy Name: About 1960 I was working as a waiter at Serendipity 3, a boutique coffee shop on the Upper East Side. Andy used to come in every afternoon and he would sit at a big table often by himself with his drawings spread out. I remember him with his ink drawing at the table for an hour or two and maybe eating something while he did it.GB: You were responsible for the “Silverizing” of the Factory, could you talk me through [...]