• A musical composition based on repetition and the continuous interweaving of points and counterpoints, as well as a disturbed, amnesic state, the fugue is at the heart of Roe Ethridge’s work. For over ten years Ethridge has used this idea of the fugue to create layered images that are both easily legible and confounding, building them into series full of twists, turns and dead-ends. He spoke with Marc Feustel about how he came to juggle his commercial work with his fine art photographs, his love for the fugue and how his relationship with his mother was the inspiration for his latest project, Sacrifice Your Body. MF: Marc FeustelRE: Roe EthridgeMF: How did you start out with the Sacrifice Your Body project and what was the inspiration behind [...]

  • Photojournalists have lost their lives in pursuit of reportage from danger zones around the world. But the medium has had relatively few prisoners of conscience. China’s Liu Xia certainly qualifies as the most prominent, incarcerated now and for the past several years in the Beijing apartment she shares with her imprisoned husband, Nobel Peace Prize awardee Liu Xiaobo.In 2012-2013 I had the privilege of organising the international tour of an exhibition of her work, “The Silent Strength of Liu Xia,” a group of 26 b&w images made between 1996 and 1999 by this dissident Chinese artist, photographer, and poet, while her husband Liu Xiaobo was serving a sentence in a forced-labor camp. You’ll find information about the show at the website I publish and edit, liuxiaphotos.com, the [...]

  • Pedro Alfacinha has spent the past five years working at the highly respected publisher MACK. This autumn he is opening a new gallery in Lisbon, representing an exceptional list of both homegrown, and international artistic talent. At a time when the international media seems solely interested in Portugal’s economic turmoil, Harry Hardie talks to Alfacinha about his commitment to employing photography to create an exciting and positive future.HH: Tell me a bit about your background, I know you were obviously at MACK, where you have been for some time, but before that?PA: I was born in Lisbon and in 2006 I moved to London. I had been interested in photography all along, and decided very early that I wanted to study in London. In 2007 I enrolled in [...]

  • The title for Maxwell Anderson’s ongoing series speaks for itself, Domestic Beauty. The images are simple yet poignant and teach the viewer to have a different perspective on the mundane and everyday - the things we often overlook. Here he talks to Sadie Spring about Domestic Beauty as well as the independent publishing company that he runs, Bemojake. Sadie Spring: What drew you to become a photographer and publisher?Maxwell Anderson: I knew I wanted to be a photographer from the age of about 16. My first serious girlfriend - you know, the one who you think you’re in love with, but it’s just your adolescent body going crazy - had just broken up with me and I found solace in my camera, and I put all my energy in to taking [...]
  • It is always hard to lose a friend or family member, but generally the death of a parent is felt as a far greater loss than most. The grieving process is something that differs for each of us, for Alex Catt it took him on a solitary journey to the Alps where his project, There Is No Sun Without Shadow, came to fruition as a personal response to the death of his father. Catt states that his reasoning for making the journey to the Alps was “to find meaning, to be alone.” His images are filled with a palpable sense of solitude. The stillness and muted tones of the landscapes heighten the feeling of isolation within the series, and the quiet nature of the portraits with sorrowful expression or a faceless self-portrait of [...]
  • Joan Fontcuberta has, somewhat inconspicuously, become one of the most prolific photographers of the last half-century. The Catalan artists work, having started his career in advertising during the Franco dictatorship era, has been strongly influenced by political propaganda and subsequently questions our use of photography as evidence. Fontcuberta’s images combine compelling narratives with straight-faced humour to engage with audiences in a way that provokes them to consider not just the authenticity of his own work, but the evidence presented within museological institutions. At Paris Photo last year, Fontcuberta approached Greg Hobson, the Curator of Photographs at the National Media Museum, about creating a show of his work. The resulting collaboration, Stranger Than Fiction, is the second show at the new Media Space at the Science Museum, and is sure to follow [...]