• Anyone who is familiar with the work of the photographer Gregory Crewdson will be aware of his predilection for mystery and his ability to depict a brief moment of pensive introspection. As though catching a glimpse of someone else’s life through their own memories, Crewdson’s pictures behave in peculiar ways on our own psyche. He is as well known for his moving cinematic scenes, as he is the high production values and physical labour that goes into producing them. Crewdson has just released his latest body of work, Cathedral of the Pines, a moving set of painterly photographs that seem to push back the tide of modernity with a contemplative stillness of almost religious proportions. Cathedral of the Pines was shot [...]

  • A frame is a boundary, a threshold; the demarcation between the edge of a work of art, and everything that lies beyond that—namely, it communicates to the viewer the border between the world, and the representational space of the work of art—which itself refers back onto the world. When we speak of photography the first act of framing occurs in the demarcation of space set out by the photographer and the photographic apparatus; literally in negotiating what is to be included in the picture, and what is not. As such the edge of the photograph can be thought of as being just as significant as what is more centrally oriented in the frame, because it speaks in terms of absences—that which is not in the frame—which [...]

  • Images taken over forty years ago are reanimated in Bill Henson’s mysteriously beckoning new monograph – Particle Mist. Drawn from three series: Untitled 1974, Untitled 1975, with additional and previously unseen photographs from an unfinished work begun in 1976, they are ostensibly of young dancers – girls in ballet class. Arranged in three acts that reference classical narrative ballet form, we see the girls in Act 1, in their boaters and blazers, in pairs or alone. They aren’t speaking, just outdoors and waiting, perhaps for an exam or class or for something to stir them from their private thoughts. Act II – and the girls are in the penumbra of an old-fashioned, high-windowed studio, hair demurely secured in white hairbands, wearing regulation leotards. They don’t converse; they stretch, lean against the barre, [...]

  • Next up in “Why do you hate photography?”, we bask in the vitriol of UK based Irish, writer, photographer and founder of SMBH Barry W. Hughes. Numbskull cheerleaders for overblown egos lie cheek-by-jowl with duplicitous careerists. Misogynist frauds pose as princes. Pointless darlings are bloated by prestige. Vanity, faux-Feminism, neo-Pictorialism and the ensuing dumbed-down imagery, fuelled by an idle Instagram generation hell-bent on popularity have distorted a landscape of promise. Pandering curators and festival directors monopolise in backroom cabals. The gallery system is rotting in a Chelsea basement; it's Hackneyed swan song echoes down university corridors. I too have not been impervious to the gilded arrogance of the pop set; lean lessons learned. Self-entitled and be happy is the message, photography cannibalising itself for the sake of personality is the outcome. A carefully [...]
  • Today we kick off a new feature where we ask photographic luminaries, such as today's candidate David Campany, “Why do you hate photography?” Last week a student came to tell me she was following her boyfriend's process of having his new false eye made. She would photograph the whole thing - the optical tests, the manufacturing, the fitting, everything. It sounded fascinating. What did she want from me? "Can you tell me who else has made photographs about false eyes?" I'm weird enough to know of at least a couple of photographers who have, but what would this knowledge have benefitted her, really? Her ‘research’ is her boyfriend's experience, the specialists, the hospital, their relationship. Andreas Feininger, a very versatile American photographer, once published a book titled Photographic Seeing. This was back in [...]
  • HOTSHOE's Joe Faulkner recently spoke to the Dublin based photographer Eamonn Doyle about his new exhibition END. currently on show at Michael Hoppen Gallery in Chelsea. Joe Faulkner: Who has been the biggest single influence on your work?Eamonn Doyle: It’s impossible for me to say really. You soak up so much over the years from photography, painting, literature etc. It’s difficult to know what does and what doesn’t filter through into the work. The photographic influences almost go without saying – William Eggleston, Saul Leiter, Josef Koudelka etc.  I’m usually more inspired and triggered into action by text rather than other imagery. I read a lot of Irish literature also.IMAGE - END.Twins © Eamonn Doyle. Courtesy Michael Hoppen GalleryJF:  This series is based in your hometown of Dublin. Do you feel that your experience as an insider [...]